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Recent Change in the Production of Federal Reserve Notes

A recent change has occurred in the production process of Federal Reserve notes. In order to increase efficiency, the Treasury’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing is using equipment that allows Federal Reserve notes to be printed on larger sheets of paper. Find out more about the production changes and how they affect the $1 note in this video. For more information about this change, please visit the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE

202-452-2955



FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT INQUIRIES

United States Secret Service Office of Public Affairs

202-406-5709

Images of the Redesigned $100

 
 
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
  • $100 Note - Image
 

Image Use

The images above are 250 pixels wide by 150 pixels high. Visit our Currency Image Use page for guidance on how to use these and other currency images.

Video Clips

Producing the $100 Note
Producing the $100 Note

Production footage of the redesigned $100 note. Download

Security Features of the $100 Note
Security Features of the $100 Note

Close-up footage of the new security features in the redesigned $100 note. Download

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Frequently Asked Questions

  • When will I start to see the new $100 note in circulation?

    The new $100 note will begin circulating on October 8, 2013. Once it is issued, any commercial bank, savings and loan, or credit union that orders $100 notes from the Federal Reserve will have its order filled with the new design. Distance, demand, and the policies of individual financial institutions will be the deciding factors in how quickly redesigned $100 notes reach the public, both in the U.S. and in international markets.

  • Do I have to trade in my older design notes when a new one begins circulating?

    No. It is not necessary to trade in your older design $100 notes when the new ones begin circulating. All U.S. currency remains legal tender, regardless of when it was issued.

  • Will older and redesigned $100 notes circulate at the same time?

    It’s important that consumers and businesses know that it will not be necessary to trade in their older design $100 notes for new ones. Older designs of Federal Reserve notes remain legal tender, and will not be recalled, demonetized or devalued.

    However, beginning on October 8, 2013, Federal Reserve Banks will only be paying new design $100 notes out to financial institutions. As older designs make their way through the banking system, they will eventually get returned to the Federal Reserve, where they will be destroyed.

  • When was the last time the $100 note was redesigned?

    The last redesign of the $100 note began circulating in March 1996.

  • Why does the United States government periodically redesign its currency?

    The United States government primarily redesigns U.S. currency to stay ahead of counterfeiting threats and keep counterfeiting levels low. The Federal Reserve, the Treasury Department, its Bureau of Engraving and Printing, and the United States Secret Service continuously monitor the counterfeiting threats for each denomination of U.S. currency and make redesign decisions based on these threats. An inter-agency committee makes recommendations on design changes to the Secretary of the Treasury, who has final authority for U.S. currency designs.

  • Which denominations of currency does the Federal Reserve issue?

    Federal Reserve Board currently issues $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100 notes. The largest denomination Federal Reserve note ever issued for public circulation was the $10,000 note.

 

100 Holder